teaching

If you teach in an ABE program in Minnesota, you're probably aware that there has recently been an upsurge of interest in expanding Distance Learning (DL) opportunities for adult learners in our fair state. While certainly not all distance education is computer-based, a good portion of it is, and that portion is likely to increase in the coming years. In my technology training role, I get to have a seat at many of the tables where the discussions about DL policies are happening. It was at once such table, many months ago, where I got a particular bee in my bonnet.
Watching my peers teach at Neighborhood House has helped me glean strategies to augment my own teaching. My peers demonstrate a myriad of teaching strategies we’ve learned in our TEFL class; it has been helpful to see best practices incorporated into the lessons we actually teach.
Out & About in the World of Computers
ABE teachers often ask me if there is a particular textbook or curriculum that I can recommend for teaching basic computer skills to low-literate and/or non-native English speaking adults. While I'm not normally in the habit of pushing one publisher's content over another, here is one book that at least makes the attempt to serve this need - and there are very few that do, so it's probably worth taking a look.
Hand with letters
Spurred by my tutoring experiences and a desire to someday teach abroad, last September, I decided to pursue my TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) certificate.
Brain
Barbara Strauch posits that our brains become more distracted as we age (surely we can all attest to this!) and asks if this aging brain can still benefit from education. The answer is a resounding yes as she argues that scientists have found that brain development continues into middle age and that adult brains can find big picture solutions better than younger brains.
Christmas bulb

The first years I worked in ABE, I taught in an evening computer lab with students of all levels and backgrounds. Each class in the program had one time slot a week for computer time, rotating through for 45-60 minutes each. Most of the classes were English language classes, but there was also one basic skills class and one GED class. For whatever reason, most of the ABE and GED students (and their teachers) weren't really interested in learning computer skills, and made very little use of the computer time allotted to them.

How often do you find yourself demonstrating how to do the same thing on a computer--create an email account, use an online learning resource, or just search on Google? Jing is a tool that can help!
Turkeys
Yep, the big turkey day approaches! If you will be sharing information about the holiday with your learners, you might enjoy browsing these resources for teachers and students.

   

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